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Overview  |  Collection Information  |  Manuscripts 2013  |  Manuscripts 2017  |  Manuscripts 2018  |  Manuscripts 2019

Overview

This catalog provides classification and curation information for growing number of unpublished manuscripts in The Brautigan Library's Digital Collection. Manuscripts are listed in order of their acquisition into the collection. Collection and categorization information is provided for each manuscript. Links provide manuscript download and access to further information.

Collection Information

These manuscripts were submitted in digital format to The Brautigan Library after its move to Vancouver, Washington, in 2010. A new category, "DIG" (Digital) was created for the Mayonnaise System to accomodate these manuscripts. The Mayonnaise System, a classification system developed for The Brautigan Library. Manuscripts are cataloged according to fourteen general categories, the year of submission, and the order of acquisition into the category. For example, DIG 2013.005 indicates the manuscript was the fifth one cataloged in 2013 to the DIG category. Manuscript synopses were provided by authors at time of submission. Librarian's Comments and samples from the beginning of the manuscripts provide additional information.

Manuscripts in DIG category = 24
2013 = 5 manuscripts
2017 = 1 manuscript
2018 = 1 manuscript
2019 = 17 manuscripts


Manuscripts 2013

Total manuscripts cataloged this year = 5
Missing manuscripts = 0
Total manuscripts added to collection this year = 5

The Captain and The Doctor

Dr. Bob Hoke and Sue Clancy (illustrator)
MS #320
DIG 2013.004
Registered 24 September 2013 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
"We get more of what we focus on" says Dr. Bob Hoke before telling the story of his war-time experience as a younger man and the lesson he learned. Sue Clancy took notes (and drew pictures). Download a PDF of Hoke's manuscript.

Beginning
Once upon a time there was a certain Submarine Medical Officer who went on a 60 day underwater patrol on a large nuclear submarine with 152 other people on board the "boat." As was traditional in the "silent service" he was not only expected to be the doctor but was cross-trained to "drive" the submarine.

Librarian's Comment
This lovely little manuscript was created by local artist Sue Clancy, with her father, Bob Hoke. Clancy illustrates Hoke's story. The combination of the two is very enjoyable. They submitted this digital manuscript and agreed to make it available for downloading and reading in PDF format. There is no physical manuscript in The Library collection.


Gamelan (Music for a Shadow Play)

Lawrence R. Tirino
MS #319
DIG 2013.003
Registered 1 September 2013 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
I grew up in Queens, New York, but am now an ex-patriot, living in Ecuador. It pleases me to submit Gamelan (Music for a Shadow Play) to The Brautigan Library.

This manuscript is a work that is neither prose nor poetry—neither short story nor novel. It's [a William S.] Burroughs' cut up brought into the 21st Century. We have reached beyond post modernism and have entered the era of the hyperlinked mind. This is a story of a man who grew up in the fifties and went to Viet Nam. He came back to work for the CIA in South America during the 1970s and eventually became a contractor for Booze Allen. He then stole his desk files and turned them into stories that he sold while playing music on the street. To say any more would spoil the dark adventure. Download a PDF of Tirino's manuscript.

Beginning
Chucha de tu madre! Que bestia!
Louis grumbled under his breath as he listened to the men on red scooters visiting all the small shopkeepers. Chulqueros! He spat into the gutter. Todo el pueblo anda chiro; meaning of course that everyone's pockets held lint, or dust, or assorted garbage, but none of them held any money.

Librarian's Comment
CIA. Spies. South America, stolen files turned into stories . . . it all sounded interesting when Mr. Tirino contacted me from Ecuador and asked about adding his manuscript to The Library collection. This may be an example of hiding in plain sight, so enjoy this one while you can. He submitted this digital manuscript and agreed to make it available for downloading and reading in .PDF format. There is no physical manuscript in The Library collection.


LaSalle Street and The Hutchman File

Brian Spicer
MS #318
DIG 2013.002
Registered 31 August 2013 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
Two stories by Spicer: "LaSalle Street" and "The Hutchman File."

"LaSalle Street"
Not every person who belongs to high society knows much about the top levels of political power. One who does is Ed Githens. He has influence beyond his private sector, corporate standing. The summer's events are followed by the intrigues of autumn, and Ed seems to be secure. But he suffers limitations even though he has help from people on LaSalle Street. Federal officials do something unprecedented. Download a PDF of Spicer's manuscript.

Beginning
The man who had authorized the building project that could be seen from Jeffcott's farm was rather vigilant now, several years later. He had been, and would be for a long time. From that point on the farm's boundary someone who had been told what to look for might actually see a corner of the house built by the newcomer. Then if he climbed a tree he could get the more spectacular view: a good-sized clearing that contained the full form of someone's enviable residence. Ed Githens took steps to make sure his home would remain more or less a secret. Along with his vigilance, though, was a playfulness that often seemed hard to defend. It was one of his experiments to give his new cell phone number to just one person outside his family. This would be a complete stranger. The question was, how long before additional strangers would be using the number? He'd subject these people to some longwinded greetings.

"The Hutchman File"
Leonard is released after being held for two years at a secret location. He is fascinated by the murder of a journalist who worked in Seattle. He is also consulted by an official who tries to discern someone's high-level mischief, and he is convinced at last that he can identify one of his abductors. Download a PDF of Spicer's manuscript.

Beginning
A backyard having a swale to one side and loose thicket to the other might be plenty of space for someone's abiding presence. It'll have to do. A stricken man in his fifties will be here for the rest of his life. He tries to remember the decisive things that happened in the past three years. The story's available to him in a few fragments that he has trouble with. He knows it took place in a distant part of the country. One question is, does it have anything to do with the murder of the journalist Nathan Keefe? It's hard to see how. Nathan became too famous because of his blog, and he was trying to stay virtuously independent when he rejected the offer of employment as part of a radio talk show team. His body was found in one of the storage buildings behind a house in Skamania County. Now the fifty-something man has the idea that he should be able to relate this to a fragment of memory, so he's at this again. But he looks over at his cottage when he hears the back door opening. Shelly, his wife, walks out to where he's resting at the picnic table. She tells him something about their planned visit to Battle Ground, set for the next morning. Soon she walks to the front yard, leaving her companion to drift back in thought towards Nathan. There's the problem of how to evaluate the dead man's influence on a certain corrupting movement. It's been denied by his friends and relatives that Nathan agreed to the contractual obligations of those who take part in the movement's vile practices. And as far as the television commentators would care, it's only in the last five days that these practices have become worth mentioning. When he begins to feel more discomfort, Leonard Hutchman arises from the bench at the picnic table and somehow begins to stagger towards the back door. He enters the house. In the afternoon and evening he keeps trying to remember the fragments.

Librarian's Comment
Brian Spicer visited The Brautigan Library this month and asked about adding his writing to the collection. He is an interesting man, a bit nervous about sharing his work with the public, but willing to experiment with this first sample. He submitted this digital manuscript and agreed to make it available for downloading and reading in .PDF format. There is no physical manuscript in The Library collection.


Ubiquita del Bianco (A Confused Despair)

Pietro Altieri
MS #317
DIG 2013.001
Registered 18 February 2013 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
A Confused Despair is a work that cannot be placed in a predefined section. Indeed, it is not a traditional novel, or a paper, or a collection of tales or poems. Actually it is a sort of mosaic, a puzzle of fragments of our society, an assembly of passages of poetic prose, episodes drawn from news, promotional inserts, first-person stories, pieces of dialogues. All these parts are shown as the visions of an homeless philosopher that is able to read others' thoughts. Fragments that, once put back together, constitute a merciless and sarcastic portrait of today's world. Download a PDF of Altieri's manuscript.

The Master's Ass and More

Phillip Frey
MS #040.5
HUM 1990.005
Registered 14 June 1990 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
The Master's Ass and More is a collection of stories ["The Master's Ass," "Drapes," "Other Voices," "Hey, Jack," "H,m," "Old Hat," "The Savings Bank," "The Hero of Lost Causes," "Subject's Last Interview," "Five," "David," "The Fool," "Jack and Jill," "The Candle and the Flame," "The Turtle," and an "Epilogue"]. Some are short and some are long. Some are light and some are dark. Some are true and some are not.

Beginning
Security cameras sat in the trees like birds of prey, spying down on a gravel road that cut through the Malibu woods. A quarter-mile down the road stood a canvas-covered gate crowned with razor-sharp spearheads. On either side of the gate ran a high barbwire fence that surrounded a three-acre estate.

Librarian's Comment
In January 2013, Phillip Frey submitted a digital revised version of his collection of stories, The Master's Ass and More. I noted, about the original stories, "Some are short and some are long. Some are light and some are dark. Some are true and some are not." Of the originals, Frey said, "They were in bad shape and needed the scalpel. I feel good about having performed the operation." This revised manuscript is not counted as a separate manuscript in the Library's collection and is available for downloading and reading in PDF format. Download a PDF of Frey's manuscript.


Manuscripts 2017

Total manuscripts cataloged this year = 1
Missing manuscripts = 0
Total manuscripts added to collection this year = 1

The Ballad of the Otter (Revised)

P.D.S.
MS #321
DIG 2017.001
Registered 29 August 2017 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
A work of fiction about life and fictional places and characters in the fifty-first state, Superior, in the Great Lakes region, set in the late 1990s and early 1990s. The work incorporates humor and spirituality and was inspired by shows like St. Elsewhere and Twin Peaks. The Ballad of the Otter is an update of sorts to my novel, Tallin Avenue. Download a PDF of Sibson's manuscript.

Beginning
Wednesday night, WUSS, the college station (University of Superior State) is airing The Lithuanian Hour with Jan Pinkorash. The Pre-Soviet national anthem of that country is playing. The show is starting. Father Karlash is going out for a drive after a long evening nap.

Librarian's Comment
P.D.S. is a pen name for Peter Sibson. He submitted this digital manuscript and agreed to make it available for downloading and reading in .PDF format. There is no physical manuscript in The Library collection. This is the second novel Peter Sibson has submitted to The Library. The first was a physical manuscript, Tallin Avenue (MS #273; ALL 1993.001). For that novel, Sibson used the pen name Kent Presse.


Manuscripts 2018

Total manuscripts cataloged this year = 1
Missing manuscripts = 0
Total manuscripts added to collection this year = 1

Elias

Greg Moore
MS #322
DIG (ADV) 2018.001
Registered 31 December 2018 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
A work of fiction about the owner of AhabOil, written in the style of the Left Behind series. Based on the Biblical story of the prophet Eljah. While its goals are spiritual (illuminating a passage in the Bible), its narrative is purely adventure. So, spiritual hunters have something saltier than a feelgood devotional, and adventure hunters are exposed to an action-packed adventure into spirituality. Download a PDF of Moore's manuscript.

Beginning
The Bible, in the First Book of Kings, and a few chapters into the second book, contains one of its most extensive biographies, that of Elijah. Nothing is known of his family or birth, except that he came from Tishbe, a village somewhere east of the Jordan river, whose ruins have not been found. The territory was controlled by the kingdom of Israel, which maintained an uneasy peace with its sister kingdom of Judah, united only by the common enemies surrounding them. Israel was officially Jewish, but during its four centuries of independence spent most of its years in government-sanctioned idol worship, particularly that of Ba'al, the male sex god, the god of choice in the land of Canaan, the fertile area east of the Mediterranean sea. There were several thousand Israelites who worshiped the true God, who lived honestly and decently; but they were scattered, hardly aware of each others' existence. When Elijah came on the scene, the monarch was named Ahab, a man of weak and yielding character, who married a hell-on-wheels named Jezebel, who introduced Ba'al worship on a grand scale, and persecuted the priests and prophets of God by threat and, on occasion, massacre. The seventeenth chapter of Kings begins with Elijah suddenly appearing before King Ahab and announcing himself as a messenger of God, declared that "there shall not be dew nor rain these years, but according to my word."

Librarian's Comment
Greg was the first author to submit a manuscript to The Library following it being featured in a episode of the popular radio program This American Life, 29 December 2018. See the "Press" menu tab, above. When he submitted this manuscript, Greg said, "I have just submitted my only novel, Elias, in celebration of the Brautigan Library. While I can leave piles of my things on the foyer table at church and even facebook entire manuscripts to every one of my friends in a flash, the idea of a complete stranger pulling my book off a shelf, finding it intriguing, and reading it is utterly wonderful. I have dreamed, since my youth, for a place where people could freely share their creative works. Thank you for creating The Brautigan Library." I did not create The Library, but it is my privilege to be the current Librarian. Greg's book is interesting and relevant. Download it. Give it a read.


Manuscripts 2019

Total manuscripts cataloged this year = 17
Missing manuscripts = 0
Total manuscripts added to collection this year = 17

Lumber World

Richard Holeton
MS #339
DIG 2019.017
Two volumes: Vol. 1: Lumber World: A Novel; Vol. 2: Lumber World: The Rejection File
Registered 1 November 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis, Vol. 1, Lumber World: A Novel
"Going to the Lumber Yard may never be the same again!" proclaims one of the bogus blurbs for Lumber World on the mocked-up "back cover" of its make-believe book jacket (see Volume 2, Lumber World: The Rejection File). "Big business and government agents team up, with their banks of computers and surveillance satellites, for an immense top-secret energy project in the Sahara Desert; as they become entangled with a small band of nomads and, halfway around the world, the eccentric crew of a California lumber yard, the results offer both analysis and antidote for modern times," reads the fake front flap. I wrote this unpublished novel, along with the tongue-in-cheek blurbs, mostly in my twenties, completing it in 1984. I guess it should be classified as "juvenilia" or work "produced in youth or adolescence, before the writer has formed a mature style" (Free Dictionary)—although I'm not sure I ever developed a "mature style" or completely outgrew an adolescent sense of humor. Also in my later, published work I still retain some fondness for the optimism, oddball characters, and sheer exuberance of the 1970s counterculture, depicted here just beginning to grapple with the powerful forces of the straight world, as was I. So I am grateful to deposit this text with The Brautigan Library—with its own offbeat origins and mission—where perhaps it will encounter new friends (or maybe a screenwriter or two to share my longstanding dream of creating Lumber World: The Movie!). See Volume II, Lumber World: The Rejection File, for a catalog of my efforts, with editors and literary agents, to publish the novel in the 1980s. Download a PDF of Volume 1 of Holeton's manuscript.

Beginning, Vol. 1, Lumber World: A Novel
Down at the foot of the High Sierra in Northern California, God put a quarter in the earth's Magic Fingers and nothing Animal, Mineral, or Vegetable stopped vibrating for the full thirty seconds; God got his money's worth.

Lumber World was the epicenter.

The tremor could be felt halfway around the world: As far as North Africa, rivulets streaked down the faces of dunes, rearranging countless grains of sand and altering forever the complexion of the Sahara Desert.

"An Opener!" Cap'n Bob was banging his fist on the side of the Joker's van in the Employee Parking Lot.

"Hear me Joker? I brung us an Eye-Opener!"

"Unnhh," the Joker was saying.

Author's Synopsis, Vol. 2, Lumber World: The Rejection File
The[se] 90-some pages of letters, postcards, and other documents, comprise a record of my extensive attempts to publish [Lumber World: A Novel] during 1984 and 1985—and the results of those efforts in dozens of rejections. Thus in this case, ironically, The Brautigan Library, home of unpublished manuscripts, makes available to the reading public along with a manuscript also a complete history of its trials and misfortunes, its hits and misses, its aborted journey or destiny not to be published (at least so far!). Such a "rejection file" constitutes a record of disappointment and seeming futility, punctuated by rare moments of hope and encouragement, with which many writers are familiar, and which most readers never see (see Preface for examples of famous works rejected by publishers). As it turns out, aided in some cases by my name-dropping of certain friends, professors, and other writers, Lumber World succeeded in getting the attention of many successful editors and literary agents (some illustrious, and at least one who became notorious), and I have annotated the documents with commentary containing contextual information and historical notes for interested readers. Download a PDF of Volume 2 of Holeton's manuscript.

Librarian's Comments
Holeton's two-volume manuscript addresses the essence of all those in the Library's collection: their rejection by traditional publishers. Vol. 1: Lumber World: A Novel sprawls with Quixotic scope. But, it was rejected by many publishers. Vol. 2: Lumber World: The Rejection File collects the notices, responses, and other evidence against ever seeing this book on a retail shelf. I'm reading both—fascinating and entertaining, a tongue in cheek but oh so honest portrayal of a writer on a doomed mission—during quiet nights here at The Brautigan Library.


The Shane Dougherty Story

Len Kirschner
MS #338
DIG 2019.016
Registered 1 November 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
A story about saving seats in your youth and in your later years tinged with a misplaced interest in England. Download a PDF of Krischner's manuscript.

Beginning
I know that it's hard to believe that the story of someone I met last year starts in 1966 . . . but it does. The scene was the Michigan State Fair in the band shell seating waiting for the show to start that would eventually bring out the Supremes. If this had happened in 1967, the summer of the Detroit riot, things may have gone differently but this was 1966 and things were more care free for those stateside.

I never felt right saving seats. If people want a seat—be on time—so I had a bad feeling when my father said to spread out our jackets on seats because he was saving seats. Eventually all those having seats saved for them all showed up . . . except one. Everybody took their jackets back and my father put his hand on the seat next to him. The show started with the warm up act and this unseen unpunctual person did not show up.

All at once a big, big, smiling African-American woman came up and my father said "This seat is saved," and she said "that's fine," and proceeded to sit on my father's hand. She looked over and said "honey, when they show up they can sit on my lap." My father withdrew his hand. I said inside "yes, yes, yes," being a seat saving hater.

Librarian's Comments
Kirschner said he wrote and submitted this short story on a dare. He did not provide details.


Almost Like Texas

Len Kirschner
MS #337
DIG 2019.015
Registered 1 August 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
A sidewalk snow and ice removal compliance officer goes to the home of a local socialite and gets caught in a three day blizzard of passionate transformation. Download a PDF of Krischner's manuscript.

Beginning
He was told the work was seasonal. If winter had only spread its wings about five months more he could have been vacationing in Traverse City eating cherries and spitting out the seeds. Instead he had set up his table in front of Foster's Coffee Shop and was staring at two things . . . the latte he was sipping and people's shoes.

Librarian's Comments
This short story is part of Kirschner's collection Snot Lake. It's a good one. He promises more.


Shenanigan Balderdash & Co.

Ivan de Monbrison
MS #336
DIG 2019.014
Registered 26 July 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
The story takes place in Marseilles, France, the characters are Ivan, the narrator, Nanaqui, the zombie-ghost of the poet Antonin Artaud, and Sarah, a witch. Download a PDF of de Monbrison's manuscript.

Beginning
The world so easy to fight seemed so easy . . . I think it is Ginsberg on Apollinaire's grave who wrote these lines, back in another era, another world from now. Why am I thinking about this line today? Once again back in good old Marseilles after all these years of dying, craving, loneliness (I love to indulge into self-pity).


Poemas De Puebla

Max E. Barnes Herrlander
MS #335
DIG 2019.013
Registered 7 February 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
In 2008, the author arrived in Puebla, Mexico, from Sweden and attended a one-month entry-level course in the Spanish language. Herrlander wrote poems daily for public presentation and discussion. This became an investigation into communication and the simplicity of pure expressions. While learning a new language, what happens when you use the simplest words and don't provide context? These poems represent the exploration from both a philosophical and language standpoint. Download a PDF of Herrlander's manuscript.

Beginning
Poem of the day
Twentieth of June

breakfast is the more important meal for the day. i am
eating in a restaurant on the beach. the sun is incredible
there are big dogs, black and white with a lot of hair.

i am almost dead.
i am very hungry,
a lot of pain,
a lot of pain.

finally an angel arrives with a plate of eggs and beans.

life is wonderful.


Love Call Me

Pierre Gauvin
MS #334
DIG (POE) 2019.012
Registered 12 February 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
These 34 poems are distilled from a 350 page hand written letter I sent by post to my friend Eric Simon. He introduced me to Richard Brautigan's books in 1994 by suggesting I read Dreaming of Babylon. I have read and reread all of Brautigan's writings ever since. Download a PDF of Gauvin's manuscript.

Beginning
Coffee of the afternoon

Hands touch each other accidentally. So brief in the living room.
Sun on the carpet,
shadow of your hair.
Particles floating, lit by the ray.
I turn around,
look at the angel.
Heart of the world in the light.
I drink a sip of my steaming coffee. Presage is behind me.
I do not ask myself questions.
You will give the answer.
Life of the heartbeat leads to this moment: Sunny living room.

Librarian's Comment
Pierre said he composed these poems from his letter to Eric Simon. He initially wrote these poems in French and then translated them into English. He feels the English translations have qualities that the French originals do not, and vice versa. Only the English translations are included in his manuscript. Pierre recently published with Eric Simon a small collaborative limited edition (100 copies) artist book, J'ai couché dans un Yi-King. Each copy is rubber stamped by hand with 34 sentences in French, some of which are taken from Gauvin's letter to Simon. He also produced an audio version. LISTEN here.


Making It Up As I Go Along

Jamie Graham
MS #333
DIG 2019.011
Registered 10 February 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
Making it Up As I Go Along is the memoir of Doug King, a British inventor, creative director and copywriter, who moves to America. Doug's ideas are original and clever. His life story is full of amusing anecdotes, and interactions with well-known rock stars and business entrepreneurs. The narrative jumps forwards and back in time, as his adventures and relationships are described in often-explicit detail. Download a PDF of Graham's manuscript.

Beginning
1. 2018. Crossroads John Mayer. T-shirt. Uniqlo jeans. Black Adidas sneakers.

Doug is sitting in the hair stylist's chair watching white hair falling on a black smock.

Yes, it's white; not the very light grey color it was the last time he noticed it. Not the salt and pepper color it looked, in a certain, optimistic light, a few years ago. Certainly not the thick, long, light brown locks he had the first time he paid for a proper hair stylist.

Librarian's Comment
There are fifty-five chapters in Graham's manuscript. As she writes, "Each is marked with a year, a song, and what the subject was wearing. In case this is ever made into a movie." A Spotify playlist of the songs can be found at: https://open.spotify.com/user/1213844121/playlist/2UBCtphCFcr1hhnQCrk4FC?si=j3Vjh1ZIQLO6FiYB3yAzVA


Salvation of Bertram Davis

Rand Attaway
MS #332
DIG (HUM) 2019.010
Registered 3 February 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
Following an indescribably horrific event, Bertram [Davis] emerged a changed but broken man. But in spite of the loss of his career, social stigmas, and the habit [of] externalizing his innermost thoughts to the annoyance of all, Bertram is determined to rise above his situation. With the help of his friend Marty and the other broken people at group therapy, he embarks upon adventures for the quest of self in the urban jungle of Baltimore, [Maryland]. The Salvation of Bertram Davis is a humorous, modern-day Quixotic tale. Download a PDF of Attaway's manuscript.

Beginning
Since the night of his 30th birthday, the night he was raped on Miami Beach, Bertram Davis would be forever changed. What was once a model human, cast in the mold of a routine and complacent life, had been broken and reassembled into a flawed state. Whether it was from the horror of the event, the shock from his near death experience, or the ridicule he endured for the many months that followed, one thing was certain: he would never be the same man again.

Librarian's Comment
Rand Attaway described himself as an "unknown, but aspiring, writer." He said he thought his manuscript was best suited for the HUMOR category. Talking about his manuscript, he said, "Since its completion, I have always lamented the reality that my manuscript would likely go no further than the confines of my hard drive. Discovering your library has given me new hope, that eyes beyond the circle of my friends might actually read it. I reviewed the manuscript on the website. I forgot all about the restaurant in the plot called 'The Library,' central to the life of the protagonist. I love the little coincidences that pop up in life, and I can't think of a more appropriate place for my story to reside. My sincerest and most heartfelt thanks."


Upstream

Judith Harway
MS #331
DIG (POE) 2019.009
Registered 21 January 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
This manuscript of poetry was composed between 1980-1986 by the young woman I was in my twenties. The poems—largely concerned with the mysteries of perception and the emotional excitement of ideas—constitute a first book that was abandoned in a drawer as the demands of teaching, child-rearing, elder-care, and life's other wonders swelled to fill all of the psychic space the author had available. More than thirty years and a few published books later, these poems make their way out into a harsher world than the one in which they were composed. Download a PDF of Harway's manuscript.

Beginning
Wash

My mother practiced homely arts.
Her palette of colors, lights, the absences
of bodies blurred as knees and elbows

bagged, remembering. Her pattern:
pale before the dark, a landscape's
slow accumulated muddiness

redeemed each Tuesday, folding
me again. I held the poses,
donned and shed my skins, and came, clean

and unasked into the cycles
occupying her. Some stains I hid.
But sometimes stains defined

the medium of me: her bright sheets shook
and hung on lines, the hot iron
of perfection, lost their artfulness

if I stepped back where distances cohere.
Here is my body. Here, the lovely grit
she couldn't gloss no matter how she tried.

Librarian's Comment
Judith Harway is a professor at the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. Her poetry has been widely published. This manuscript, however, as she said, was forgotten as she was "swept along in the relentless flow" of adulthood. "It was a pleasure to meet my former self while dusting this off, but I wouldn't venture to revise her work. Rather, I am delighted to imagine her manuscript finding a home among its peers, and, perhaps in time, a reader or two. With my heartfelt thanks, and applause for the winsome mission of the Brautigan Library."


Autocratic Students Society

Michael Lawrence Clark
MS #330
DIG (SOC) 2019.008
Registered 16 January 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
In the early years of the Oceanic superstate, during the lead-up to the great purges, a bright young university student struggles to understand what is happening around her. While she is initially amused by fellow student Donald, an executive member of the Autocratic Students Society, she becomes increasingly concerned by his beliefs and ensuing behaviour. Download a PDF of Clark's manuscript.

Beginning
Julia stumbled into her dorm room around one AM, locking her door clumsily, and feeling her way through the darkness to bed. There she lay on her back, with her hands on her stomach. It was unlike her to get drunk, but this had not been an ordinary evening. At least I resisted his advances, she thought, during a brief respite from the nausea. She was angry with herself, for going to the pub with Donald. I shouldn't have drank so much at the auditorium. She thought about Donald's hair, and giggled. Then she disappeared into a deep sleep.


A Suite: Pi

Karama Neal
MS #329
DIG 2019.007
Registered 15 January 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
Seven musical compositions celebrating Pi Day, 14 March 2015. OrcidID called them "the perfect music for pi day." Each of the seven pieces is composed using a musical scale with the same number of notes as found in pi of the chosen base. The songs use pi in bases 5, 6, 7, 8, and 12, and notation of pi is shown in each song. Download a PDF of Neal's manuscript.

Librarian's Comment
Pi is a mathematical constant, determined by the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter. With the numerical value of pi changing based on the number base—base ten is the normal, most often used—the number of notes also changes. The number of notes and the intervals between them make for some interesting music. This is the first collection of musical scores submitted to the Library.


yudō: The Art of the Bath

Brent Emerson
MS #328
DIG (NAT) 2019.006
Registered 13 January 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
This brief pamphlet imagines an "Art of the Bath . . . using Japanese linguistic and historical-cultural tools, focusing attention on the experience of bathing, playfully emphasizing its ritualized and contemplative aspects, and appreciating all forms & themes of bathing culture." It is both a practical guide and a theoretical exploration, rounded out with dips into scientific and social matters. In some sense a central concern is to consider a phenomenon that some might consider "spiritual" from a very naturalistic/scientific perspective, balanced with some social/cultural framing. It might fit in the NAT, SOC, or SPI categories. And of course MEA and even LOV are tempting. I suppose Natural World (NAT) probably wins out in the end for me. Then, there's always ALL if nothing else seems quite right. Download a PDF of Emerson's manuscript.

Beginning
yudō is a way to approach the bath using Japanese linguistic and historical-cultural tools, focusing attention on the experience of bathing, playfully emphasizing its ritualized and contemplative aspects, and appreciating all forms &themes of bathing culture.

Librarian's Comment
Brent Emerson included this note with his submission of three manuscripts to The Brautigan Library. He was quite kind.
Twenty years ago, I was an undergraduate at Brown University, where I discovered The Abortion and other Brautigan works in the cavernous main humanities library. I loved reading books in that setting so very much that I occasionally hid them behind other books in random locations so that they would not be found and checked out by others and I could return the next day or week to resume my reading. I hereby apologize for my selfish youthful indiscretion and am so grateful to have learned (from This American Life) of the existence of The Brautigan Library! I am submitting two manuscripts of poetry and one brief treatise on bathing culture. I can think of no higher honor than being connected in this way to someone who inspired me so deeply at such a formative time in my life. I'm so grateful for your work in curating and sustaining The Brautigan Library.
— Brent Emerson


synchronology

Brent Emerson
MS #327
DIG (POE) 2019.005
Registered 13 January 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
A collection of prose poems and other forms. Completed by the author in college, writing under the influence of the oulipo, abstract algebra, Rosmarie Waldrop, train travel, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, young love, Richard Brautigan, and so many other wondrous people and moments. Much of the content takes the form of "prose poetry" or other formal structures, but I definitely consider this a work of poetry. Download a PDF of Emerson's manuscript.

Beginning
Bathe in the incandescence of a length of time, collapsing. It was never discussed how this was to be accomplished, but you'd found a way, swimming too near the surface to touch foundation. An instant shouldn't be this heavy, this difficult to catalog: now. But things in themselves seldom do what they should, called by so many voices, so many structures to imply. Witness the futile embrace of the moment, the awkward power of an accidental creation. What semblance of gesture enjoys.

Librarian's Comment
Brent Emerson included this note with his submission of three manuscripts to The Brautigan Library. He was quite kind.
Twenty years ago, I was an undergraduate at Brown University, where I discovered The Abortion and other Brautigan works in the cavernous main humanities library. I loved reading books in that setting so very much that I occasionally hid them behind other books in random locations so that they would not be found and checked out by others and I could return the next day or week to resume my reading. I hereby apologize for my selfish youthful indiscretion and am so grateful to have learned (from This American Life) of the existence of The Brautigan Library! I am submitting two manuscripts of poetry and one brief treatise on bathing culture. I can think of no higher honor than being connected in this way to someone who inspired me so deeply at such a formative time in my life. I'm so grateful for your work in curating and sustaining The Brautigan Library.
— Brent Emerson


edge of a mountain forest

Brent Emerson
MS #326
DIG (POE) 2019.004
Registered 13 January 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
edge of a mountain forest is a book-length poem, a set of equations, and a love letter to experience. Structured around the layered composition of Japanese kanji, it explores the contextual and synthetic basis of thought through and by metaphor with language. Much of the content takes the form of "prose poetry" or other formal structures, but I definitely consider this a work of poetry. Download a PDF of Emerson's manuscript.

Beginning
We swim at midnight in the blue light. Mouths of water, full and bright, moths spun in circles—even dance of flesh and water, insect, night. Our skin awake to skin of water. Eyes to waves of color playing over us and leaves above to lick dark sky.

Librarian's Comment
Brent Emerson included this note with his submission of three manuscripts to The Brautigan Library. He was quite kind.
Twenty years ago, I was an undergraduate at Brown University, where I discovered The Abortion and other Brautigan works in the cavernous main humanities library. I loved reading books in that setting so very much that I occasionally hid them behind other books in random locations so that they would not be found and checked out by others and I could return the next day or week to resume my reading. I hereby apologize for my selfish youthful indiscretion and am so grateful to have learned (from This American Life) of the existence of The Brautigan Library! I am submitting two manuscripts of poetry and one brief treatise on bathing culture. I can think of no higher honor than being connected in this way to someone who inspired me so deeply at such a formative time in my life. I'm so grateful for your work in curating and sustaining The Brautigan Library.
— Brent Emerson


Serenity's Diva Tips on Life

Chris Grenci and Candy Torres
MS #325
DIG 2019.03
Registered 9 January 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
This graphic story about Serenity, an odd-eyed cat (different colored eyes), is also an homage to Chris Grenci, who is dying of cancer. The hope is that readers will feel some of the joy Chris brought to life. It is her legacy to put a smile on people's faces. Download a PDF of Grenci and Torres' manuscript.

Beginning
One evening I received a call from a woman from the animal shelter where I picked up Spirit—my oddie sweetie queen who changed my life. She knew I liked odd-eyed cats. Yes, two different colored eyes—one blue and one green. She told me 4 month old Simone was at the "kill" shelter in danger of being euthanized.

Librarian's Comment
Chris Grenci died of esophageal cancer within days of submitting this book to The Brautigan Library. I am told she died happy that her book was here for others to read. That idea was comforting. In this way, books can outlive their authors, and continue to carry their messages to interested readers. This is one of those books. Enjoy its grace and power.


Nowhere Café & Society

Charles B. Lemmons
MS #324
DIG (MEA) 2019.002
Registered 6 January 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
This is a story about identifying one's credibility to oneself. The place is a particular area, just outside of Nashville's budding metropolitan area, where people go to find out more about themselves and their heritage. Download a PDF of Lemmons' manuscript.

Beginning
Lingering out west of town, just beyond the sea of sprawling homes and the towering apartments, a haze collected and waited. Most days it went unnoticed, but recently it clicked into Tobe's mind that Nashville was in fact turning into the LA of the 1970's. The theory often brooded in her mind during grim car rides back home. She contended, especially whenever she listened to the "Inherent Vice" audio book, That's it.


Puppy Dreams

Charlie Miksicek
MS #323
DIG 2019.001
Registered 4 January 2019 by The Librarian

Author's Synopsis
Dolly, a curious, yellow Labrador puppy encounters a mysterious light that seems to understand her thoughts and transports her on a magical journey. Download a PDF of Miksicek's manuscript.

Beginning
One day, Dolly was in her yard, minding her own business. She was staying out of trouble, which was unusual for her. She was cold, hungry, and bored.

Librarian's Comment
This is the first manuscript submitted to The Brautigan Library in 2019. Charlie said, "I would be honored to be included in this honorable institution." The Library is honored to make this manuscript available to interested readers. Charlie's manuscript is very creative, consisting of many multiple-level color photographic images with text narrative. Charlie does not say so, but, as you will see, he is exploring a new form of comics with his use of juxtaposed image and text.